Key Idea

Programs of study are used to organize academic functions (such as course requirements), people (such as faculty or students) and/or credentials (such as degrees or certificates) within Workday. Today’s major program (MP) in SIS is the analogue to a program of study in Workday.

Jump To: Overview | Program of Study Types | Primary Programs | Relationships between Programs | Programs of Study & Academic Units | Programs of Study & Effective Dating

Programs of Study Overview

Within Workday Student, programs of study are used to organize academic functions (such as course requirements), people (such as faculty or students) and/or credentials (such as a degree or certificate). Credentials may be conferred when a student completes a program of study. When a new program of study is created and students are admitted, the educational credential, or credentials awarded at completion, are placed on the student’s record with associated academic requirements.

Today’s major program (MP) in SIS is the analogue to a program of study in Workday. In Workday, majors, minors, second majors, certificates, non-degree programs, Master’s degrees, and PhD degrees are all considered programs of study. A student’s academic record(s) in Workday will track all programs of study a student has pursued or is currently pursuing at WashU.

Program of Study Types

Workday offers several categories and types of programs of study. Functionality is different in Workday for each program of study type. The table below outlines the different types.

Table outlining program of study types.
Program of study types (Click to enlarge)

*Please note: Joint programs, dual programs and tracks are currently under discussion, and more information will be added here when available later this year.

Primary Programs

Workday requires one program to be a student’s “primary” program. The primary program is by default the first active declared program the student is admitted into. The term “primary” is solely due to system configuration and will have reporting and policy implications. For students with only one major, their major is their primary program.

A program must be able to stand alone to be a primary program. Minors, second majors and some of the certificates that are not standalone cannot be a primary program.

Example of a primary program that can stand alone and is the student’s only major:

  • Student’s primary program of study: Bachelor of Arts with a major in Chemistry.

Example of a minor and second major that cannot stand alone:

  • Student’s primary program of study: Bachelor of Arts with a major in Chemistry.
  • Student’s second major (has to be bundled with the primary): Second major in Biology.
  • Student’s minor (has to be bundled with the primary): Minor in English.

Relationships between Programs

Workday Student allows the creation of relationships between programs of study, and students will have clear visibility into which combinations are possible and how the programs interact. Some degree programs require a corresponding concentration, either at the point of admission or post-matriculation.

A second major, on the other hand, will be set up as a different program of study type that doesn’t accept students for admission and can’t be the student’s only educational objective but can be bundled with an official program.

Example of relationship between two programs of study
Example of relationship between two programs of study (Click to enlarge)

Programs of Study & Academic Units

A program of study is housed in one of the schools but may have a coordinating academic unit (AU) to support reporting and business process routing. For example, a major in chemistry may be housed by the Arts & Sciences AU, but the Chemistry AU could be the coordinating AU. For this example, as the coordinating AU, Chemistry could initiate a process to change the requirements for the major, and the request would route to Arts & Sciences as the main AU. This example is for illustrative purposes only. We will start to design later this year.

Academic policies control the rules and process that students follow based on their primary program. These policies are inherited based on the academic unit that houses the the student’s primary program of study.

Programs of Study & Effective Dating

Programs of study, as with most concepts in Workday, have effective dates. When a new program is created, a first entry date is the earliest date a student can matriculate into the program. If academic requirements are adjusted for a given program, students will be required to meet the requirements as they were when the student matriculated into the program.

Similarly, the last entry date is the last date a student can matriculate into a program. This would be used if the program is being discontinued. The last entry date does not affect students enrolled in the program prior.

Effective dating may have an impact on the records and admissions processes. For example, when reporting on programs, it is imperative a user is aware of effective dates as the data viewed will be as of a certain date, like snapshot in time.

Program of Study FAQ

*Last updated 05/16/22